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Gallery Pieces

2017 Comics vs. Art

This piece was based on

Edward Hopper - Morning Sun (1952)
and inspired by Ghost in the Shell (Anime 1995)

Prints for sale HERE

My Statement:

I selected Hopper’s “Morning Sun” because it reminded me of a scene from one of my favorite anime movies “Ghost in the Shell” (1995).

In the scene, the character Motoko Kusanagi quietly contemplates her existence as a cybernetic person and her struggles to come to terms with her identity and her place in the grand scheme of things.

My degree is in digital design and graphics. After spending 20+ years in the graphic design industry, as well as creating fine arts and illustrations, I’ve returned to my passion in becoming a comics creator.

My Full Statement:

"Great art is the outward expression of an inner life in the artist." - Edward Hopper

 

I selected Hopper’s “Morning Sun” because it reminded me of a scene from one of my favorite anime movies “Ghost in the Shell” (1995). Throughout Hopper’s career, he explored the interior life of the individual and portrayed aspects of existential isolation that he saw in humanity in the face of mid-century urban life.

 

In “Ghost in the Shell,” the main character, Motoko Kusanagi, lives in Tokyo in the near-distant future. She is a member of the special-ops security force Section 9 and she’s also a cyborg--part human, part machine. Over the course of the film, Motoko grapples with her identity as a human/machine hybrid and struggles to come to terms with what (or who) she truly is and what she wants to become.

 

My connection to the Motoko character was deepened by watching the “Ghost In The Shell” TV series. I vividly recall a scene where she’s recalling of a time from her youth, being new to having an android body, and playing with a favorite doll. She hadn’t learned how to fully control the strength of her mechanical hand and she destroyed the doll. Since she was one of the youngest people to use a full android body, it wasn’t an easy process and she felt alone and disconnected from everyone. I could (and still can) relate to that feeling of isolation.

 

In the scene that I’m illustrating from the movie, Motoko awakens in a darkened room and looks at her hand. She sits up in her bed with those challenging days from her youth drifting through her cybernetic head. Motoko sombrely looks out the window into the lights of Tokyo and contemplates her place in the grand scheme of things while being confined within the parameters of her memories.

 

My degree is in digital design and graphics. After spending 20+ years in the graphic design industry, as well as creating fine arts and illustrations, I’ve returned to my passion in becoming a comics creator. With this piece, I decided to translate the sombre blues of the scene into digital halftone patterns and grey tones.

About Comics Vs. Art Exhibit

 

Comics vs Art II: The Museum Edition is the continued playful exploration of classical art through the lens of graphic artists.

 

This was the 2nd year for the Columbus Comics vs Art exhibit (The Museum Edition), a playful exploration of classical art through the lens of cartoonists and graphic artists.

 

The curator, Canada Keck, once again challenged over 40 artists to look at selected paintings (this time from the permanent collection of Columbus Museum of Art) and reinterpret them as comic art. There were 56 pieces of art created for this exhibit, all inspired by the permanent collection of the Columbus Museum of Art. These fantastic, fun pieces include ones done by comics creators, fine artists, and youth of the Star House Foundation. The Wild Goose Creative Gallery exhibited these original works in September 2017, coinciding with the Cartoon Crossroads Columbus (CXC).

 

Curator Statement:

Columbus is an amazing city for the arts with an, especially vibrant comics community. The community is always staying active and finding new ways to connect, with annual events such as the Small Press and Alternative Comics Expo (SPACE), the Independent Comics Fair (ICF), and the newest addition, Cartoon Crossroads Columbus (CXC). Columbus is home to the Billy Ireland Cartoon Museum and Library, which houses the world’s largest and most comprehensive collection of comic art.